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Archive for September, 2010

See My Friends, the new album of Ray Davies. Available in the first week of November. You can watch the site of See My Friends. You can listen to the Mumford and Sons version of Days and This Time Tomorrow here.  And listen here to You Really Got Me with Metallica.

 

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The Kinks History part one
The Davies brothers were born in suburban North London on Huntingdon Road, East Finchley, the youngest and only boys among their family’s eight children. Their parents, Frederick and Annie Davies, soon moved the family to 6 Denmark Terrace, Fortis Green Road, in the neighbouring suburb of Muswell Hill. At home they were immersed in a world of varied musical styles, from the music hall of their parents’ generation to the jazz and early rock and roll that their older sisters enjoyed. These musical experiences centred around nightlong parties held in the front room of their house, which made a great impression on the Davies brothers. Thomas Kitts writes, “The influence of these parties on The Kinks … is remarkable. Whether consciously or unconsciously, [onstage] it seemed as if Ray was trying to recreate the Saturday night parties of his family’s home—complete with chaos, beer, and singalongs.”Both Ray and his brother Dave, younger by almost three years, learned to play guitar, and they played skiffle and rock and roll together. The brothers attended William Grimshaw Secondary Modern School (later merged with Fortismere School), where they formed a band, the Ray Davies Quartet, with Ray’s friend and classmate Pete Quaife, and Quaife’s friend John Start. Their debut at a school dance was well received, which encouraged the group to play at local pubs and bars. The band went through a series of lead vocalists; the most notable was Rod Stewart, another student at William Grimshaw, who performed with the group at least once in early 1962. He soon formed his own group, Rod Stewart and the Moonrakers, which became a local rival to the Ray Davies Quartet. In late 1962, Ray Davies left home to study at Hornsey College of Art. He pursued interests in subjects such as film, sketching, theatre, and music such as jazz and blues. He gained experience as a guitarist with the Soho-based Dave Hunt Band, a professional group of musicians who played jazz and R&B. Davies soon quit school and returned to Muswell Hill, where the brothers and Quaife re-formed their old group, performing under several names, including the Pete Quaife Band, The Bo-Weevils, and The Ramrods, before (temporarily) settling on The Ravens.

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See My Friends

This is the title of the new collaborative album by Ray Davies released early in November. More news later….

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Ray Davies, winner of the Outstanding Achievement Award, presented by Noel Gallagher, at the 2010 GQ Men of the Year Awards at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, London.  The former Oasis man was at the ceremony to present Ray Davies with the Outstanding Achievement award.

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